Places to go and meet new people

places to go and meet new people

Mar 4, But sometimes you're just over that scene. Here are a few ideas on where to go if you're looking to meet someone new. couple coffee shop. In this post you'll learn 30 ways to meet new people in your local area and online. in a big city, and there were plenty of opportunities and fun places to meet new people. Just remember, before you go your separate ways to suggest getting. Now, of course you have to know how to talk to people, have a little fun, exchange contact information and take it from there. But, knowing where to go to meet.

It's not that you have one five minute chance to make a good impression and then you may never see them again. It allows you to meet people who are similar to you, in terms of your hobbies and values.

It's somewhere where there's a core of regulars, but also new people continually entering the mix. In the list below I've roughly arranged the points along these lines, with the easier ones towards the top.

places to go and meet new people

You may have to force yourself out of your routine to meet people Some people are a bit lonely because they've gotten into a daily pattern where they're either working, or they're hanging around at home pursuing solitary hobbies. That's fine, but if they want to meet some new friends they may have to shake up that pattern.

6 Great Places to Meet People

They might need to add some more social hobbies to their repertoire, or push themselves to get out and do things in the evening when they'd normally be chilling out in their apartment.

You'll meet most of your new friends easily through a handful of avenues, while other ones won't really work for you at all. You may go to a few events and not really run into anyone you could get to know better.

Or you'll find making friends there is technically doable, but logistically difficult and discouraging. Then you'll join one more club and instantly and effortlessly make a group of amazing friends. So don't get discouraged if your first few attempts don't seem to come to anything. Lots of ways of meeting people aren't perfect You can handicap yourself by looking for the ideal set of circumstances to meet people under.

places to go and meet new people

Sometimes you have to work with the so-so hand you've been dealt. For example, someone may attend swing dancing classes and feel there's not enough opportunity to get to know anyone, since new people are always coming and going, and there aren't a lot of chances to talk.

The situation may just not be workable for them, like the point above was getting at. Or they may have success if they stretch a bit, say by inviting potential friends out anyway even if it is more of a low percentage play, or by coming earlier or staying later to create time to talk to people. You've got to have some tolerance of uncertainty and rejection If someone is minimally confident and sociable, they should eventually be able to meet some new friends, regardless of where they do it.

On the other hand, if they're just too shy or insecure or awkward, then none of the avenues for meeting people will seem to work for them. If that's the case they should try to work on their other issues as well. Places to meet people Right before I get to the list, I'll mention that this article covers some ways you can find out about things that are going on in your city in the first place: How To Find Events And Clubs In Your Community Through your friends, significant other, and other people you already know This is obvious when you think about it, but I put this point first because it's way more helpful than chatting to strangers in the grocery store.

When you meet someone you like you're also potentially meeting all their friends down the road. It's more of a longer term and indirect way to meet people, but keep it on your radar.

Meeting someone's friends is also a higher quality 'meet' compared to a total stranger. The ice is already broken. You have things in common your mutual friend, if nothing else. They're probably going to be friendly and make an effort to chat to you. They're somewhat pre-screened for characteristics you like because they already know your friend.

You're more likely to meet them more than once and have a chance to get to know them and see if you click. Ideally you'll meet a person who has a ton of friends, is the center of his social circle, and is always inviting you to parties or throwing them themselves.

Don't discount the lone wolf types though. If you already have some friends you can make a conscious effort to meet their buddies. You could throw a party or organize an event with the invitation that they bring other people they know. You could ask your partner if they've got any friends you might hit it off with. Also, having a friend with you can make it easier to approach other strangers. Two people approaching a group to talk is a little less intimidating than having one person having to go in all by themselves.

This general point can also work on a much smaller scale. Like you could start a conversation with a guy in a pub and two minutes later be introduced to his friends. Work Another standard option. People who are student-aged in particular often report being able to meet a lot of friends from part-time jobs in call centers, restaurants, or large stores.

The other staff are generally in the same age group, and new people are constantly coming on board. If it's realistic for your circumstances you may even want to consider switching jobs, or getting another one on the side. For example, if you work a few shifts a week alone as a night security guard, maybe you could transfer somewhere with more social opportunities.

Volunteering You could also volunteer somewhere. Like you could put in a few hours a week working with youths, or agree to help out at a one-off fund raising party and meet the other people there.

30 Ways To Meet New People

It can be a good way to meet people who have similar values to you. I mean, not just anyone who signs up to help a particular organization for free. Classes There's classes in the sense of being a high school or university student, where of course you'll have a ton of chances to meet people. There's also the option of signing up for a class out of your own interest in cooking or drawing or whatnot.

Personally, I think signing up for a class purely to meet people is a bit excessive, but if there's a topic you want to learn about anyway, than why not? I think one small flaw with classes is that you spend a lot of time learning and focusing on the teacher and not necessarily being able to socialize with anyone.

You're often restricted to before the instructor starts talking or afterward as everyone is filing out of the room. You can break the ice with someone with the whole, "Let's exchange contact information in case one of us misses a day" thing. Talking about the course material or teacher also comes naturally. If you get assigned to do group work with people then the class just did you a favor.

If you meet someone you like, it's probably better to become their class buddy and sit with them for the rest of the semester rather than seeing what's behind 'door number three'. You can get to know them well and hopefully become friends outside of class. A club or organization The appeal is obvious.

They made eggplant parmigiana and vegetarian lasagna, among other things, then enrolled together for a second cooking course on soups. That was three years ago. These days they're in each other's kitchen almost every night, cooking up a storm. As a writing instructor, I had an ironclad rule unarticulated, of course! An editor taking the course wrote some poignant essays about his son's wedding, becoming a grandfather and learning to live alone.

I waited until after the last session, then made my move: Think about splitting the rental of a group ski lodge or beach house. It's a great way to meet like-minded people — provided, of course, you like skiing or the beach!

I happen to love the latter, so for years I bought weekend shares in single-parent beach houses. As with my "no students" rule, I never dated a fellow house member; when we played charades or had barbecues with people in the community, however, I did meet a few men I wound up dating back in the city. On my one and only bike trip, through New England, the lone male I got to know was the driver of the sag wagon.

Pick an activity that interests you — and one that's conducive to interaction. Reading to a very young child in a hospital room may be satisfying, for example, but it's also an activity that tends to isolate the volunteer. By contrast, preparing food in a community kitchen or playing piano at a senior center — both of which I've done with friends — opens broad opportunities to meet other volunteers.

Same goes for fundraising, wrapping holiday presents and teaching new skills. On planes, trains and automobiles — or waiting for them.

It's easy — or at least logical — to strike up a conversation with a seatmate; if nothing else, you've got your destination in common. Or you might kick things off by talking about the book or magazine you are reading, or your impending or just-concluded vacation.

If there's a cafe or juice bar at your gym, hang out for a bit after your workout and connect with other members. If you have a couple of friends or acquaintances who have a larger circle of friends, ask them to introduce you to new people.

If you've moved to a new city like I have, maybe your existing friends know people in your new city. Ask them to make an email connection and then follow up yourself to suggest a get-together.

Participate in Toastmasters or another speaking club. Public speaking isn't fun for most people, but when you're thrown in a setting where everyone shares the same fears and learning curve, it can quickly break the ice. Speaking clubs not only give you the confidence to make presentations, but they also give you the chance to meet a variety of new and interesting people.

Go on a wine or beer tour. I live in a city with dozens of local breweries, and brew tours are common occurrences here. If you have wineries nearby or even restaurants that offer wine tastings, join in the fun and meet other connoisseurs. Beer, wine, and socializing always seem to pair well together. Take a dance class. Ballroom dancing is a great way to get up close and personal with potential new friends or romantic partners.

But you don't have to stick with ballroom dance. Take a jazz class, Zumba, or Salsa dancing. It's great exercise, and you'll meet fun people who enjoy kicking up their heels. Find a church or religious community.

If you're a spiritual person or have a strong faith, your church, synagogue or other religious community is the perfect place to meet supportive, like-minded friends. Go to seminars, book signings, or speaking events. Look in your local community guide to see what happenings and events are coming up in your area.

Attend some of these events and try to sit next to someone who might be looking for a new friend too. Hang out at a jazz or music club. Do you enjoy jazz or some other music genre that works well in a smaller venue and allows for conversation? Find a cool, low key club where you can listen to great music and start up an interesting conversation. Take your book or computer to a coffee house. When I start to feel house-bound working from home, I go to a local Starbucks or indie coffee house to work.

How To Meet New People (Even If You're An Introvert)

It's easy to keep your head down in your computer or book, but look up every now and then and survey the landscape. Strike up a conversation with the person at the table next to you. You never know who you might meet.

How To Meet People

Hang out at the local museum. Get thee to a museum! Do you like art? Most cities have one or several museums devoted to something that interests you. You'll have no shortage of things to talk about if you chat it up with another museum-goer.

Take an art class or any class.

Best Places to Meet New People - Dating

Taking a class automatically throws you into a group of like-minded people. Try to enroll in a more hands-on class rather than a lecture course, which will allow you to talk with other students. Some kind of art class generally allows for more conversation. Make a point to introduce yourself to other students and initiate conversation with those around you. Join the board of a charity. Do you have a cause that's particularly meaningful to you?

If so, get really involved by becoming a board member or key player for the organization. Get a part-time job working with people you like. If you work from home or in an environment that isn't conducive to meeting new people, then consider a part-time job working in a more social environment.

Eat dinner at the bar of your favorite restaurant. It can be intimidating to go to a restaurant by yourself, but try dining out and sitting at the bar instead. Whatever you do, don't put your head in a book or your iPhone.